Eating Disorder Community Responds: What’s The Hardest Part Of Holiday Season & How Can A Loved One Help You?

Thought it might be a helpful post, this time of holiday year, to remind everyone struggling with eating disorders and recovery and this and that mental illness –

That there is a wide ole’ community in the world that is struggling with you.

That every few people you pass in an airport or on the street, one of them has thought or felt the same way that you have felt. To some degree. In whatever way their reality shapes for them.

I posted a question on Instagram: “What’s the hardest part of holiday season & how has a loved one helped you?”

The responses are varied, but the sentiments are similar.

Continue reading “Eating Disorder Community Responds: What’s The Hardest Part Of Holiday Season & How Can A Loved One Help You?”

When You Miss Anorexia: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before A Relapse

Last Sunday, I gave the keynote speech at the Denver NEDA walk.

It was meaningful, full of women and men I got to meet in person versus online.

I felt a lot of connection and intimacy – and an environment where people understand each other.

I also felt lonely.

Continue reading “When You Miss Anorexia: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before A Relapse”

“It’s Buffet Style”: 5 Eating Disorder Situations That You ‘Can’t Even’

Had one of those moments today – sitting at my desk around noon.

My personal email dinged as I haplessly knocked buttons on my keyboard trying to make a press release for work sound remotely articulate.

I sighed, tabbed over to my gmail account.

A Paperless Post invitation appeared at the top of my Inbox.

I clicked on it – going through the whole masquerade of electronically opening the letter.

Like, cmon Paperless Post, it’s 2017. Envelopes are dying. You can’t trick us millennials with your virtual envelope rip. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

An invitation appeared to a friends house in a couple weeks.

Immediately intrigue followed by immediate dread as I opened the invitation and saw the two glowing little shitty words:

POT LUCK!

Pot. Luck.

I groaned –  audibly – bashing my forehead onto the keyboard.

…. Okay, dramatic. I didn’t do that.

But God I hate pot lucks, which leads me to this post.

5 situations that I just ‘can’t even’ with my eating disorder. Let’s see if you agree: Continue reading ““It’s Buffet Style”: 5 Eating Disorder Situations That You ‘Can’t Even’”

Calorie Counting: Does It Ever Go Away?

… I don’t know. And maybe, that’s okay.

Hear me out:

Calorie counting. If you struggle with it, you relate to Lily Collins in Netflix’s “To The Bone” scene when her sister refers to her calorie counting as ‘calories aspergers’, and if you don’t – I can only beg that you never attempt to. ((Also, I originally entitled this post Calorie Asperger’s in light of this scene – but it is insensitive to co-opt the two, so I changed it.))

To The Bone

Coming off a weekend in Texas. Ate a lot – drank some wine. Went to my 10-year high school reunion and visited family. Feeling uncomfortably full as I write this – sipping a vanilla latte; ordered it and forgot to ask for nonfat milk, which made me laugh a little because I immediately thought to myself “Wonder how many calories that adds on?”

Some things never change.

You know that scene in Good Will Hunting? The 1997 movie about Matt Damon as this poverty-stricken Boston math genius. Beautifully written (RIP Robin Williams). But, there’s that scene where Matt Damon is told he has this ‘ability’ to solve math equations faster than anyone ever. He’s the best in the world – has a unique brain that rattles off numbers.

There’s a parallelism that resonates here with calorie counting for me, which leads me to this post.

 

Continue reading “Calorie Counting: Does It Ever Go Away?”

The One Sentence You Should Never Say To Someone With An Eating Disorder

“I can’t even tell that you have one.”

This sentence helped take away 8 years and 40lbs of my life – and I’m reposting it here today because in light of NEDA week, I think it’s a reminder to anybody searching for resources on the internet.

“I can’t even tell that you have one.”

Such a simple few words. We say it all the time.

Continue reading “The One Sentence You Should Never Say To Someone With An Eating Disorder”

“We Can’t Save Your Tooth”: Truth About Eating Disorders 3 Years Later

This post is a struggle, but it needs to be written.

If my message doesn’t carry its usual snarky platitudes  – please understand that I’m grappling with this past week and I’m generally a bit more ha-he-ho about these eating disorder subjects (‘Cause, really, who wants to read the woe?)

However, this message is important.

Should I write it? I asked my partner today on a hike.

(Side note: it’s 66 degrees in Boulder at the moment. Double-edge sword of being like WOO WE GET TO HIKE… and also, OH GOD. GLOBAL WARMING IS GOING TO END THE PLANET.)

Anyway, we were chatting about the events of the past week. It’s embarrassing, I said. I never thought this would catch up to me.

Write it, he said. So you can be an example. People are short-sided. Maybe they need a reminder that the effects of eating disorders are long-term.

… So, here I am. And here I am to remind:

Bagel Saturdays – yaaasss
A couple weeks ago, I went to the dentist. Falling in line with the rest of the nation, I have avoided that chair for a year.

Was it an oversight? Yes. Was it intentional? Of course.

I’ve felt pain in my gums and molars for the past year and been filled with an ever-present growing dread.

It’s Gingivitis, my New York dentist said – with little concern. You need to floss more.

But my molars, I said.

He waved it off. You’re fine. The x-rays show nothing.

Accepting his nonchalance eagerly (purposely), I skipped outta that office and moved to Denver – where I’ve been for a year and some – with an increasing pain in my gums and back right molar.

Go to the dentist, my partner said for months.

I will, I’d say curtly – with that whispering fear in my brain.

Why so nervous? Some might ask. You’re healthy, you’re recovering.

I am. I am both of those things.

But, you don’t forget the cigarettes you’ve smoked in your life.

The ones you still sneak on a bad day.

You don’t forget the years you threw up – bile clinging to the back of your teeth – and the lack of concern you paid to your mouth.

The pain worsened over the past couple months; gnawed at me like a consistent reminder of my past.

Brushing my teeth became excruciating before I finally relented.

I booked a bloody appointment.

Sitting in the chair, I introduced myself to the dentist.

Nice to meet you, I said. I know something’s wrong and I’m not sure what it is but my back molar is pretty painful.

He nodded. We’ll take some x-rays.

Let’s do it, I said. Let’s face the damn music.

20 minutes later, he came back with a fresh-faced, nervous-looking assistant.

My throat tightened.

You want the good news or the bad?

Bad, I said. I’m not much for glazing.

He nodded. There’s been trauma to your teeth.

I sighed. Yeah, I was bulimic for years.

He nodded – probably more than a little surprised I admitted it – but kept his composure.

Did you smoke? He asked.

Yes, I said. Still do on the occasion.

He nodded again, as though he already knew the answer and was relieved to hear me confirm it.

Okay, he said. I’m going to be honest: Your back right molar is extensively damaged. He brought up my x-ray. Did you know you had Gingivitis?

Yeah, I said. The whole bleeding gum thing kinda gave it away.

It’s turned into periodontal disease, he paused. Now, this is common. A lot of people have it and don’t ever know. But, yours has progressed fairly severely from what we can tell.

I picked at the skin around my cuticles.

You’ve lost somewhere around 6 millimeters of bone on your back molar, he said – pointing at my x-ray. And you have a cavity that has wrapped around your gum lines near the molar.

What next then? I asked – cutting off all emotion. And why the fuck didn’t someone else notice this when I was bulimic?

He shook his head. It can take years to form into this. You could be perfectly healthy now and just starting to experience the after effects.

Fantastic, I muttered.

He stared at me.

Why are doctors such duds?

I’m sorry, he said, earnestly.

I shrugged. Saw this coming.

I didn’t… but Dr. Sociopath didn’t need to know.

Here’s what we can do, he said – in his flat manner. We’ll have you come back next week, figure out just how severe this cavity is  – and we’ll try to fill it before anything else.

What are the chances of that working?

He shrugged. Can’t tell you until we’re in there.

I left that day; made an appointment.

I also booked a second opinion.

I so badly wanted this dentist to be wrong that I was willing to spend $100 bucks on a second glance.

The optimistic side of me thought “It’ll be fine. They’ll fill it.”

The pessimistic side of thought “You’re screwed.”

Turns out, neither were particularly correct.

(I say this while popping another painkiller in a bookstore.)

The second opinion confirmed the first.

I dragged back in on Thursday to the original doctor and sat in the chair.

For 2 1/2 hours, the dentist and assistant hygienist worked to save my tooth. Doped up on Novocain didn’t stop the pain of them poking and prodding into my gums (hence, the painkiller).

For 2 1/2 hours, I thought about my eating disorder. I thought about the purges, the binges – imagining my teeth in the process.

As they struggled to get a filling, I sat in the chair and I thought to myself: “If only I knew then what I know now.”

Maya Angelou
At the end of the day, here’s the deal:

I was anorexic and bulimic for years – I smoked anywhere from 10-12 cigarettes a week – and I’m 3 years into recovery.

I was never an “every meal” purger. More a 4-5x/week purger and I truly believed I wouldn’t suffer consequences cause hell “I wasn’t as bad as that person or horror story.”

When they got into my mouth, they confirmed that my tooth was decaying from the inside out.

Not yet at the nerve, I won’t have to have a root canal. (wahoo, good news, I gargled to them.)

However, bulimia took a toll.

My molars have lost bone, my gums have fairly severe periodontal disease, and my gums have receded.

They cannot save my back right molar.

They removed the cavity from my gum line but my tooth is 2/3 filling, which can only last temporarily – a year or two.

At the end of the day, I have two choices:

Have the tooth extracted and chew on other molars, or have gum surgery and a crown.

They tested my other teeth: with the exception of a couple, most are strong. They will be fine if I get this shit under control.

Inevitably, I will spend $1000s of dollars on my teeth throughout the years – and that’s a financial burden I’m just beginning to sort through.

Now for some real talk: Is this the end of the world? No.

I’ll live, and I’ll get my mouth under control.

A kick in the ass, my partner said. We’ll get better about flossing and brushing.

But, I can’t help but sit here right now writing this – and shake my head.

How short-sided of me to think for all those years that there wouldn’t be repercussions.

How silly of me to think I could throw up meal after meal, run mile after mile, smoke cigarette after cigarette to keep hunger muted –

And not wind up dealing with the consequences.

I used to go to the dentist when I was bulimic and wait for the ax to fall.

Certainly, this will be the time they tell me my teeth are screwed.

When I started recovery, I thought to myself “A-ha. I got outta ‘dat scot-free.”

But, I suppose I’m here to remind you that every decision has a consequence – some for the better, some for the worse.

And you can’t quit an eating disorder expecting zero repercussions.

You don’t just get to be like “BUT WAIT, HEY NOT FAIR. I WAS SICK AND IT’S NOT MY FAULT AND I DIDN’T WANNA MESS WITH MY TEETH.”

If only we could bargain with our bodies.

The guilty side of me is resentful of my choices –

I’m down, admittedly. I’m angry at the things I did and the lack of care I inflicted on myself.

I’m angry at 18-year old me – hunched over the toilet, ice cream splashing back up into my face as it hit the surface.

I never thought at the time that I’d age. That life would carry on at a regular weight – and I’d be working hard every day to advocate for recovery.

Hindsight truly is 20/20.

Look, I know I’ll forgive myself. Just give me a couple days. There’s worse shit in life and my life is good.

I can be mad and feel guilty, but truthfully – what’s the point?

I’m not gonna go relapse over it. I mean hell, I don’t want dentures. (lol)

I’m not gonna go run 10 miles and pray that exercise makes up for it.

I’m not gonna go punish myself.

I’m just going to be and spread my message as I can.

Be a walking example of the good and the bloody bad.

There’s nothing you can do about the mistakes you made. They are yours to deal with and manage (sometimes in the future).

I’m not going to stop living over its effects. Hell, been there done that.

But, I will change my habits.

That “secret” stash of cigs. It’s over. I have lived in a world where consequences don’t apply to me and I’m 27-years old and 1-2 cigs a week or even a month isn’t cutting it anymore.

Tonight, I’m going to wrap up this blog – publish it – prep for a podcast interview on ‘drunkorexia’ and have a beer with my partner when he’s done studying (and yes, have food as well).

We’re going to sit outside and talk about this or that. And then we’ll drive to Denver, feed my dog, cook some pasta, and burrow down in the living room in sweatpants to watch a movie.

Life keeps going. You keep moving.

I’ve got solid relationships, a healthy lifestyle, shelter and motivation.

I’m not ever going back to who I was – but the traces of her linger always.

And perhaps, at the end of the day, I need those traces to remember how far I’ve come.

Have a good weekend, y’all. <3

“Trump”ing Eating Disorders: Guest Post for My Blog in Light of 2017

“She looks old and wrinkled.”

“She was hotter sick”

“Someone should’ve told her she looked bad sick.”

“She’s so pretty.”

“Poor girl.”

“SHE’S AN ALCOHOLIC NOT A DRUNKOREXIC.”

“This girl be FUCKED up.”

“I’d fuck her.”

“She got an ass.”

“So tired of hearing about sorority girls with eating disorders. NEXT.”

“Someone should give that bitch a real problem to cry about.”

“I think she’s beautiful.”

“She has a nice smile.”


Oh, the internet.

A place I liken to “seeing someone else puking so you start puking and then everyone else starts puking” 2016.

Thanks for the line, John Oliver.

Continue reading ““Trump”ing Eating Disorders: Guest Post for My Blog in Light of 2017″

“Is It Wrong To Have An ED Right Now?”: Grieving With An Eating Disorder

9 years ago on 9/15/07, my best friend fell out of a tree and in a moment, he was gone.

He was just – gone. My life, his family, our friends – forever altered the night my best friend went to fetch a football from a tree, and a branch snapped.

There are images of that day that seem so clear – there are hours I can’t remember at all.

70+ phone calls. The muffled ring tone I thought was my alarm.

“Your phone’s been going off ALL morning,” my roommate complained.

Groggy, displaced, unaware – I picked up.

“He’s dead,” my best friend screamed. She screamed. I do remember that.

“Bradley,” she screamed. “Bradley fell. He fell. His brain. He was – he climbed a tree. He fell out of a tree.”

“He WHAT?” I said. “Say words Kristina – say fucking words,” I felt the phone go limp in my hand.

“He fell out of a tree,” she sobbed. “Jordan called. They all called. WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN. Lindsey, he’s gone. I don’t know what to do. He’s gone. He’s dead.”

Continue reading ““Is It Wrong To Have An ED Right Now?”: Grieving With An Eating Disorder”

The Truth About Being A Millennial Drunkorexic

This is Rehab Day 15:

And I’m sitting on the Renfrew community couch writing a letter when Lilly comes in and lays down beside me.

“I’m bored,” she mumbles – her limp hair falling in her face.

“Got a book?” I ask, barely looking over.

“Read them all.”

“Wanna play Bananagrams?”

“God no,” she makes a face. “But I do wanna get drunk.”

“Me too.”

“Like stupid drunk,” she says. “Like blow some shit up drunk.”

I put down the letter. “Okay, well that escalated,” I pause. “But yes, I’d love a Pinot Noir.”

She scoffs. “You and your rich girl sorority shit.” She sticks out her pinky and pretends to hold a champagne flute. “Oh yes sir,” she mimics. “I’ll have a touch of the Rosé if you could ever be so kind.”

I smile. “It’s not really like that, you know. I drink the same way you do, Lil.”

“Out of a bag?”

I snort. “Not anymore. But it’s happened.”

I think back to college frat parties, slapping Franzia bags.

“It’s all the same,” I say. “Everyone just trying to reach some place they can forget.”

She waves her hand at this. “You just don’t really strike me as the type to get all that drunk.”

“You’d be surprised,” I admit. “Got myself a DWI a few years ago. Bet ya didn’t know that?”

Her eyebrows raise. “That’s actually pretty shocking, yeah.”

“Was for my parents too.”

“So you’re a drunk then?”

“No,” I pause. “Not conventionally anyway.”

“Ah – more like a desperate housewife?”

“Something like that.”

“One too many glasses of wine a night?”

“A medicinal drunk, I’d call it. I don’t really need it; just prefer it.”

“A medicinal drunk. Nice,” she grins lazily. “I’ll use that in our next AA.”

“Go for it,” I say. “I’m taking a break from it once I’m out anyway.”

“From AA,” she asks. “Or alcohol?”

“Both, I think,” I say as I scratch my head, readily confirming my suspicions that this couch has lice.

“I need to anyway,” I continue – trying to forget about the lice. “I often drink to not eat so it’s not really something I should keep doing.”

She rolls her eyes. “Yeah – alright then,” she says- plopping her hairy legs in my lap.

I look down. “Have they literally not let you shave since you got here?”

“Three months,” she says. “But yeah, we’ll see about that no alcohol thing.”

“What do you mean?”

“I’m just saying it’s hard,” she pauses. “I’ve been in and out of treatment more times than I can count and it’s hard to give up all your vices. You’re already dealing with your eating shit,” she says. “And you’re doing a good job with that- so just go with it.”

“And I’m not smoking,” I add smugly.

“Yeah well,” she pauses. “Don’t get pentecostal.” She lays her head back on a pillow- her tangled headphones on her chest. “I just think it’s harder than you know, to be back in the world and sober.” She nestles one of the earbuds in her ear. “Even if you are some yuppy bitch from Texas, you’ll want to go out with your friends.”

I smile. “Thanks for the advice.”

But she’s already lost in her world of Wu Tang Clan.

Leaning my head against the wall that day, I wonder if she’s right.

I wonder if I even mean what I’ve said:

It takes me 2 years to realize, I didn’t.

Continue reading “The Truth About Being A Millennial Drunkorexic”